It represents the elite.  THe 1% and defends their interests, and responds to their donations and lobbying teams.  It seems like if you can’t afford a lobbyist, your vote doesn’t matter much.

It represents the elite.  THe 1% and defends their interests, and responds to their donations and lobbying teams.  It seems like if you can’t afford a lobbyist, your vote doesn’t matter much.

Fault Lines — History of an Occupation.

Great 25 minute mini documentary on the first 3 months of OWS — the birth of the movement, it’s evolution, and the police brutality crack down and clearing of the camps.

It is one in a series of mini documentaries done by Al Jazeera on OWS.  

theatlantic:

A How-To Guide for Depressed Young Environmentalists

After the 2008 election, we saw an opportunity to win both federal climate legislation and to secure an international climate deal in Copenhagen. When both went down in flames, many climate activists (myself included) fell into a kind of depression.
Fast forward to 2012. We’re living through the warmest year in American history. Wildfires and droughts are plaguing the West, prompting experts to warn of a looming food crisis, and Bill McKibben’s tour-de-force Rolling Stone piece “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math” has been viewed 1.2 million times in two weeks. The listservs I’m on are filling up with huge threads with subject lines like, “I’m scared.”
What happened? What do we do now? I and many other members of the millennial generation have spent the past few years developing answers to these questions. The good news is that we now know a great deal about what works, and we know what we need to do. […]
So how do we, as a generation that will be grappling with these issues far into the future, ensure that the good curves win out?

Read more. [Image: Chris Eichler/Flickr]

r

theatlantic:

A How-To Guide for Depressed Young Environmentalists

After the 2008 election, we saw an opportunity to win both federal climate legislation and to secure an international climate deal in Copenhagen. When both went down in flames, many climate activists (myself included) fell into a kind of depression.

Fast forward to 2012. We’re living through the warmest year in American history. Wildfires and droughts are plaguing the West, prompting experts to warn of a looming food crisis, and Bill McKibben’s tour-de-force Rolling Stone piece “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math” has been viewed 1.2 million times in two weeks. The listservs I’m on are filling up with huge threads with subject lines like, “I’m scared.”

What happened? What do we do now? I and many other members of the millennial generation have spent the past few years developing answers to these questions. The good news is that we now know a great deal about what works, and we know what we need to do. […]

So how do we, as a generation that will be grappling with these issues far into the future, ensure that the good curves win out?

Read more. [Image: Chris Eichler/Flickr]

r

(via occupyla)

The task of an activist is not to navigate systems of oppressive power with as much personal integrity as possible; it is to dismantle those systems. — Lierra Keith

"Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more
of everything ready-made. Be afraid
to know your neighbors and to die.

And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card
and shut away in a little drawer.

When they want you to buy something
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know.
So, friends, every day do something
that won’t compute. Love the Lord.
Love the world. Work for nothing.
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it.

Denounce the government and embrace
the flag. Hope to live in that free
republic for which it stands.
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man
has not encountered he has not destroyed.

Ask the questions that have no answers.
Invest in the millenium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.

Say that the leaves are harvested
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.
Put your faith in the two inches of humus
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.

Listen to carrion — put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come.
Expect the end of the world. Laugh.
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts.
So long as women do not go cheap
for power, please women more than men.

Ask yourself: Will this satisfy
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep
of a woman near to giving birth?

Go with your love to the fields.
Lie down in the shade. Rest your head
in her lap. Swear allegiance
to what is nighest your thoughts.

As soon as the generals and the politicos
can predict the motions of your mind,
lose it. Leave it as a sign
to mark the false trail, the way
you didn’t go.

Be like the fox
who makes more tracks than necessary,
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.”

—Wendell Berry

http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/8567.Wendell_Berry